Search

Mailing List

For all the latest news and features, sign up to receive our FREE updates by email:


DNA-binding transcription factors in prokaryotes

Posted on 24. October, 2012.

Bookmark and Share

How organisms contend with environmental changes depend on their genes and ability to regulate their expression. DNA-binding transcription factors play a central role by regulating gene expression By considering the abundance of TFs in bacteria and archaea, the role of DNA-binding domains and their partner domains, and the effects of duplication events in the evolution of regulatory networks provides a comprehensive picture for how regulatory networks have evolved in prokaryotes.

The repertoire of DNA-binding transcription factors in prokaryotes: functional and evolutionary lessons

Ernesto Perez-Rueda  and Mario Alberto Martinez-Nuñez
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Doi: 10.3184/003685012X13420097673409

ABSTRACT
The capabilities of organisms to contend with environmental changes depend on their genes and their ability to regulate their expression. DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in this process, because they regulate gene expression positively and/or negatively, depending on the operator context and ligand-binding status. In this review, we summarise recent findings regarding the function and evolution of TFs in prokaryotes. We consider the abundance of TFs in bacteria and archaea, the role of DNA-binding domains and their partner domains, and the effects of duplication events in the evolution of regulatory networks. Finally, a comprehensive picture for how regulatory networks have evolved in prokaryotes is provided.

In conclusion, diverse evolutionary forces have generated and modelled the TRNs, such as gene duplication, gene loss, changes in regulatory mechanisms (regulatory role modulation), acquisition of new activities, modular rearrangements, and finally, functional divergence.

We believe that with the availability of more information, we will be able to understand in a more comprehensive fashion the evolutionary dynamics associated with regulatory networks. In this context, new experimental approaches that combine techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation, microarray analysis, or next-generation sequencing are allowing scientists to explore the processes of transcriptional regulation in vivo and to discover interactions not previously described, thus providing new opportunities to identify new regulatory mechanisms beyond TFs or more complex global signaling networks, such as the virulence traits of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FULL ARTICLE

Click here to find out more about Science Progress.

Click here to subscribe to Science Progress.